Study Recommends Partner Empathy for Pain Coping

Newswire — Researchers at the University of Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology (UMIT, Hall, Austria) and the University of the Balearic Islands (Palma de Mallorca, Spain) have confirmed the analgesic effects of social support – even without verbal or physical contact. The short communication, entitled “Dispositional empathy is associated with experimental pain reduction during provision of social support by romantic partners” by Stefan Duschek, Lena Nassauer, Casandra I. Montoro, Angela Bair and Pedro Montoya has recently been published in the Scandinavian Journal of Pain. The authors assessed sensitivity to pressure pain in 48 heterosexual couples with each participant tested alone and in the passive presence of their partner. Dispositional empathy was quantified by a questionnaire. In the presence, as compared to the absence, of their partners both men and women exhibited higher pain thresholds and tolerance as well as lower sensory and affective pain ratings on constant pressure stimuli. Partner empathy was positively associated with pain tolerance and inversely associated with sensory pain experience. “Repeatedly, talking and touching have been shown to reduce pain, but our research shows that even the passive presence of a romantic partner can reduce it and that partner empathy may buffer affective distress during pain exposure,” said Professor Stefan Duschek of UMIT, speaking on behalf of the authors. Beyond Your Best, LLC, Concord, NH uses multiple non-drug methods and happy to include your other healthcare team...

Concord Hypnotist to present at International Hypnosis Convention August 2019

The National Guild of Hypnotists, representing hypnotists from around the world, invited Concord’s Thom Bloomquist to speak of Neuroplasticity at their August 2019 Convention. The presentation will explore how the brain changes physically in both positive and negative ways. What factors and foods can affect. The newly discovered second brain or “gut-brain” in the abdomen will also be...

WSJ Hypnosis helps multiple stomach/bowel problems

Sarah Blau settles into a wicker chair, stretching her feet onto an ottoman. In a soothing voice, Laurie Keefer, says, “I’m going to count from one to three, and as I count, your eyelids will get heavy and they’ll close whenever it feels right.” Dr. Keefer, a health psychologist at Mount Sinai Health System, has Ms. Blau progressively relax each part of her body and guides her to “a place of rest and comfort and healing.” “Enjoy the beauty of this natural, healing place,” she tells her, “and as you do, something very powerful and healthy and positive is taking place deep inside your body. Your body knows what it needs to maintain healing your gut. It knows how to keep pleasant sensations in and avoid pain and discomfort.” Hypnotherapy—when patients enter a trance-like state using relaxation and visual images—is often associated with alternative medicine. But increasingly medical centers are using it to treat digestive conditions like acid reflux, irritable bowel syndrome and ulcerative colitis, a disease Ms. Blau learned she had in 2016. Studies have shown hypnotherapy is effective reducing symptoms associated with these gastrointestinal disorders. Insurance companies usually cover the treatments. The body of evidence is strongest for IBS, but a 2013 study found hypnotherapy was effective at prolonging remission in colitis patients. And a 2016 pilot study found patients with functional heartburn reported fewer symptoms. Dr. Keefer works at the Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center at Mount Sinai. There she does hypnotherapy for patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, diseases caused by inflammation of the intestines. The treatment usually consists of...

Hypnosis helps colitis, IBS, reflux, heartburn and GI problems

Sarah Blau settles into a wicker chair, stretching her feet onto an ottoman. In a soothing voice, Laurie Keefer, says, “I’m going to count from one to three, and as I count, your eyelids will get heavy and they’ll close whenever it feels right.” Dr. Keefer, a health psychologist at Mount Sinai Health System, has Ms. Blau progressively relax each part of her body and guides her to “a place of rest and comfort and healing.” “Enjoy the beauty of this natural, healing place,” she tells her, “and as you do, something very powerful and healthy and positive is taking place deep inside your body. Your body knows what it needs to maintain healing your gut. It knows how to keep pleasant sensations in and avoid pain and discomfort.” Hypnotherapy—when patients enter a trance-like state using relaxation and visual images—is often associated with alternative medicine. But increasingly medical centers are using it to treat digestive conditions like acid reflux, irritable bowel syndrome and ulcerative colitis, a disease Ms. Blau learned she had in 2016. Studies have shown hypnotherapy is effective reducing symptoms associated with these gastrointestinal disorders. Insurance companies usually cover the treatments. The body of evidence is strongest for IBS, but a 2013 study found hypnotherapy was effective at prolonging remission in colitis patients. And a 2016 pilot study found patients with functional heartburn reported fewer symptoms. Dr. Keefer works at the Susan and Leonard Feinstein Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinical Center at Mount Sinai. There she does hypnotherapy for patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, diseases caused by inflammation of the intestines. The treatment usually consists of...

Preventing holiday weight gain with hypnosis

Preventing holiday weight gain with hypnosis As we will be soon moving into the holiday season, it is a good time to re-evaluate our relationships to our bodies and the food that we eat. Most of us make conscious efforts to eat fairly healthy during the year, but it seems around the holidays we are triggered by old family traditions, festivities surrounded with a plethora of food and drink, and activities that throw us off our normal routines. We are programmed in our subconscious mind to respond to food the way we do anything reinforced with emotion as we go through life. As we learn to change the way we look and feel about food our bodies will automatically change. Hypnosis is a helpful tool to use to help change this perception about food and our bodies. It allows access to your subconscious mind to override old beliefs and negative perceptions and replace them with more positive ones. Some simple techniques that a person could incorporate is to eliminate distractions as best you can while eating. Pay full attention to what you are eating. Eliminate the phone, TV or driving while eating. Don’t read while you’re eating. Pay attention to every bite and enjoy it! You will find as you pay more attention to your food, you will always eat less . Whenever we take a bite of food, not only are we absorb ng the nutrients, we are a so swallowing our beliefs and feelings regarding this food and how it will metabolize in our body. Every thought and feeling you have literally programs your body to respond....